Please disable your adblock and script blockers to view this page
The former Disney star did work with the guy in question, but did she get pregnant?
May 27, 2020
Racist chat rooms
May 27, 2020

Raunchy scenes somehow ended up in his personal collection to share with friends.

There were a whole lot of extra scenes shot for that limited streaming series by the television horror director. Scenes that were way too raunchy, but somehow ended up in his personal collection to share with friends.

Source: http://www.crazydaysandnights.net

There were a whole lot of extra scenes shot for that limited streaming series by the television horror director.

Scenes that were way too raunchy, but somehow ended up in his personal collection to share with friends.

Hollywood

Ryan Murphy

Ryan Murphy’s Hollywood Is an Insult to the Real-Life Trailblazers It Overwrites

“Movies don’t just show us how the world is,” says a character in Ryan Murphy’s Hollywood. “They show us how the world can be.” That line, spoken in the second episode by aspiring director Raymond Ainsley (Darren Criss), isn’t just his pitch to a studio executive. It’s the Netflix series’ pitch to its audience. The show, which Murphy created with Ian Brennan, spends a few episodes chipping away at the glamorous façade of Tinseltown’s golden age. Hollywood’s Hollywood, circa 1947, is a place where racial prejudice and homophobia run rampant and where fresh-faced young people arrive full of hopes and dreams only to end up turning tricks to pay the rent. The project Raymond ends up attached to is the story of Peg Entwistle, the real-life 24-year-old actress who jumped to her death from the Hollywood sign and became a tragic symbol of the movie industry’s heartlessness.

But midway though, the stories both Hollywood and its characters are telling begin to shift. Raymond convinces Ace Studios, currently being run by Avis Amberg (Patti LuPone) in the place of her convalescing husband, to cast his girlfriend, Camille Washington (Laura Harrier) in the lead, despite the fact that theaters all over the South have threatened to pull the studio’s movies if it releases a film starring a black actress. Since Entwistle was white, they change the protagonist’s name from Peg to Meg, but, as the studio’s head of production, Dick Samuels (Joe Mantello) points out, changing the character’s race changes the whole story. To end the first studio movie about a black woman with that woman jumping to her death in despair sends a terrible message. So, what Samuels’ version presupposes is, what if she didn’t? – Source


Read more on these Tags: