Two things that always made people suspicious

This foreign born A++ list athlete in his corner of the sports world is probably permanent A++ list. He has been running scared of late as two things have shed unwanted attention on how he reached the top. A fictional novel that came out last year that had a character based on him and a hack of his medical records by a wikileaks type group both make the same accusation

Source: http://www.crazydaysandnights.net

Reader Blind Item

This foreign born A++ list athlete in his corner of the sports world is probably permanent A++ list.

He has been running scared of late as two things have shed unwanted attention on how he reached the top.

A fictional novel that came out last year that had a character based on him and a hack of his medical records by a wikileaks type group both make the same accusation – That he has seriously abused performance enhancing drugs throughout his entire career from a young age and the establishment of his sport has turned a blind eye to it.

Two things that always made people suspicious –

His superhuman ability to bounce back from injuries very quickly and his defined muscular frame which is more like a professional bodybuilder than athletes from this sport.

Rafael Nadal

 

In ‘Trophy Son,’ Fictional Character Accuses Real Life Tennis Stars of Doping

The professional tennis trainer Bobby Hicks claims nearly everyone at or near the top of the men’s tour uses performance-enhancing drugs.

“It’s pervasive in tennis and has been for years,” Hicks said.

And he is willing to name names, starting with Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic, Andy Murray and David Ferrer.

There is one catch to these very public accusations: Bobby Hicks is a fictional character.

Hicks appears in Douglas Brunt’s new novel, “Trophy Son,” which will be released next week. It tells the story of Anton Stratis, a tennis prodigy whose childhood is stripped away by an ambitious father who nurtures talent and resentment in his son. Stratis, his entourage and his rivals are all made up.

For the first 80 or so pages, every character is fictional. But then, in Chapter 15, Brunt drops in Hicks’s speculation.

More than anything else in the novel, those few lines are likely to leap off the pages into a public debate. – Source