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He is living off an annuity at this point and could use a cash infusion.

This former A+ list mostly television actor who had a hit and miss movie and television career since, with way more misses than hits is someone all of you know. He has run through a ton of money. He is living off an annuity at this point and could use a cash infusion. Everyone is afraid to give him a job though because of the pattern of addiction.

Source: http://www.crazydaysandnights.net

This former A+ list mostly television actor who had a hit and miss movie and television career since, with way more misses than hits is someone all of you know.

He has run through a ton of money.

He is living off an annuity at this point and could use a cash infusion.

Everyone is afraid to give him a job though because of the pattern of addiction.

Chris Kattan

Chris Kattan Claims He Broke His Neck During ‘Saturday Night Live’ Sketch (EXCLUSIVE)

For 18 years, Chris Kattan has harbored a secret that he’s finally ready to share: The comedian believes he broke his neck while performing a sketch on “Saturday Night Live” in 2001, an accident that he says nearly paralyzed him, led to years of addiction struggles and sidetracked his career.

In his new memoir, “Baby Don’t Hurt Me: Stories and Scars from Saturday Night Live,” provided exclusively to Variety before its May 7 publication, Kattan reveals the specifics of his injury, which he is claiming took place during the show’s May 12, 2001, episode. In one sketch, he writes that he fell back in a rickety chair — landing hard on the stage, painfully hitting his head.

Kattan first shared news of an old injury while appearing on “Dancing with the Stars” in 2017, in order to explain why he was so stiff while moving around on stage. But he never alleged that it happened on “SNL” — until now.

In the book, Kattan complains that he still suffers the effects of that moment, which can be found as a clip on NBC’s website.

“Even today, I still can’t open my hand wide enough to use my fingers normally on the keyboard,” he wrote. “The impact that my injury and subsequent surgeries had on my career was immense, but more importantly, the fallout proved to be devastating to some of the closest relationships in my life.”

In an interview this week at Variety’s offices, Kattan said he told SNL executive producer Lorne Michaels and producer Ken Aymong about the accident. Aymong, the comedian said, promised to “take care of it,” and that Michaels passed along a doctor recommendation. Kattan also told Variety that NBC paid for two of the five surgeries he had over the years.

Michaels declined a request to be interviewed for this story. A spokesperson for NBC said the network had no record of any claim and declined to comment further.- Source