Please disable your adblock and script blockers to view this page
That would be bold.
July 4, 2019
It would be nice if she could really show the world what kind of guy he is.
July 5, 2019

Whether it is because of the deaths or not…

Whether it is because of the deaths or not, the rum of this A list actor is picking up orders left and right, and not just from the neighboring country. Apparently the word has spread and hotels on several island countries have started buying the rum for fear there guests will also be killed if they don't.

Source: http://www.crazydaysandnights.net

Whether it is because of the deaths or not, the rum of this A list actor is picking up orders left and right, and not just from the neighboring country.

Apparently the word has spread and hotels on several island countries have started buying the rum for fear there guests will also be killed if they don’t.

Your guess is as good as mine ~F

Is Counterfeit Alcohol Behind the Dominican Republic Deaths?

FBI investigators are currently comparing blood samples from the deceased tourists to alcohol samples at a Dominican resort

Over the past few months, a string of mysterious U.S. tourist deaths in the Dominican Republic has caught the attention of tourists all over the world. To date, there have been at least 10 tourist deaths connected to the Dominican Republic in the last year alone, with the latest tourist, Louisiana woman Susan Simoneaux, dying a week after returning from her honeymoon in Punta Cana. Although an autopsy report is currently pending, like many of the other tourists who died after visiting the island, Simoneaux was reported to have had fluid in her lungs at the time of her death — and while Dominican Republic officials are insisting that the deaths are unrelated and that the island is still safe to visit, many are wondering just what the hell is going on.

To date, the most widely reported theory regarding the U.S. tourist deaths in the Dominican Republic is that they may have been linked to counterfeit alcohol, or bootleg liquor. This theory primarily stems from the fact that several of the deceased tourists, such as Pennsylvania women Miranda Schaup-Werner, 41, who died of a heart attack on May 25th; Yvette Monique Short, 51, who died in June 2018; and Robert Bell Wallace, 67, who died in April, all had drinks from the minibar prior to falling ill, albeit at two different resorts and on three separate occasions. (Schaup-Werner was staying at the Grand Bahia Principe Bouganville Hotel, while Wallace was staying at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Punta Cana; Sport was staying at the Bahia Principe in Punta Cana.)

On May 30th, a Maryland couple, Edward Holmes, 63, and Cynthia Day, 49, was also found dead in their rooms at the Bahia Principe Hotel in La Romana. Although it is unclear whether Holmes and Day also drank from the minibar prior to their deaths, Holmes, Day, and Schaup-Werner were all found to have fluid in their lungs at the time of their deaths, a condition known as pulmonary edema.

According to the New York Post, FBI investigators are looking into the counterfeit alcohol theory by comparing alcohol samples from at least one of the resorts, the Bahia Principe Hotel in La Romana, to blood samples from the victims. The FBI is reportedly trying to determine what type of liquor the tourists drank before their deaths, as well as whether the liquor was counterfeit or tainted with any dangerous chemicals. Source


Read more on these