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She can kiss all that network money away if she gets involved.
October 14, 2020
4 blinds in a row
October 15, 2020

This was limited to just a few dozen people.

With the help of power brokers on the East Coast, this A list artist who is openly Satanic and lives her life the way Satan would want her to, is going to earn nearly $1M for a one on one immersion experience which she hopes will give the purchaser the ultimate Satanic experience.

The Introduction

With the help of power brokers on the East Coast, this A list artist who is openly Satanic and lives her life the way Satan would want her to, is going to earn nearly $1M for a one on one immersion experience which she hopes will give the purchaser the ultimate Satanic experience. Depending on the results, several companies then would be willing to financially subsidize the experience to make it more affordable for others.

It would still cost a minimum of $10K-25K, and those would be the “leaders” who would then spread out and recruit at lower levels.

It previously had a test run in Europe and was a huge success, but was limited to just a few dozen people.

It has now been modified based on the trials from Europe.

Marina Abramovic

Marina Abramović: ‘I’m an artist, not a satanist!’

Every morning, Marina Abramović gets out of bed and puts on a pair of slippers. One reads “fuck” and the other “negativity”. “That is how to start the morning with a smile on your face,” she says. Then she will make breakfast to tango music. Sometimes, she will retreat to a hut in the woods by her house in upstate New York, for six days with no food, to contemplate a giant crystal she keeps there and “connect with the memory of the planet”.

This delicious glimpse into the life of the world’s most famous performance artist comes from a new documentary for BBC One’s Imagine series. “I think it’s important to demystify the idea of this glamorous life. It’s just down to earth,” she tells me, completely seriously, of the film – even though her house, built in the shape of a star, is filled with amazing furniture and art, and the grounds are vast enough to hold an aircraft hangar-sized shed containing her archive. It’s all fabulous – as is Abramović, who is funny, warm and yet somehow otherworldly (she goes in for shamanism, crystals, clairvoyants and star signs). I concede there are down-to-earth elements – when we speak via Zoom, for example, she is drinking a mug of Yorkshire Gold tea, discovered through a Welsh friend.

I’m quite taken with her woodland hut, overlooking a river, which has no electricity or a bathroom – only a giant crystal, a chair and a bed. How often does she go there?

“Very often. And then I got Lyme disease and I didn’t go for a while.” She smiles. “But I overcame the fear of ticks.” Overcoming is an Abramović theme. From her earliest work, she has explored physical and emotional endurance, confronting fear and exposing vulnerability. In her piece Rhythm 10 (1973), she stabbed a knife at speed between the spaces of her spread-out fingers; the following year, for Rhythm 0, she lay in a gallery in Naples alongside a table of 72 objects including chains, whips, a pistol and a mousetrap, and allowed visitors to do whatever they wanted with her (she still has scars from it). There was the time she lay in the centre of a burning five-pointed star (1974; she ended up losing consciousness) and the two weeks she spent living, on show, in three elevated boxes in a New York gallery in 2002. – Source


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