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I guarantee the dog will be rehomed as soon as photos are no longer needed.
November 14, 2020
He opens the door with a big smile and he’s stark naked.
November 14, 2020

The friend did agree to be there at the killing, but refused to actually do anything untoward.

He really wanted to get back in the good graces of the band that fired him. He went from making lots of money and attending the best parties, to just being a hanger on. He knew the band wanted full control of their name. He knew there was a battle going on. He asked one of his friends to help him, but the friend said no. What did he need help with?

He really wanted to get back in the good graces of the band that fired him.

He went from making lots of money and attending the best parties, to just being a hanger on.

He knew the band wanted full control of their name.

He knew there was a battle going on.

He asked one of his friends to help him, but the friend said no.

What did he need help with? Killing a fired member of the band.

There would be one less person who could claim the name of the group.

The friend did agree to be there at the killing, but refused to actually do anything untoward.

Hey, not reporting the murder is pretty untoward.

Our killer managed to pin the blame on the friend.

The killers also got a relative of the friend to accuse other band members of the murder.

Tom Keylock

Band: The Rolling Stones

His friend: Frank Thorogood

Killed: Brian Jones
Founder and original leader of the Rolling Stones

Other band members: Keith Richards, Mick Jagger

Fresh evidence on The Rolling Stones’ Brian Jones’ ‘murder’ appears in new Netflix documentary

Fresh evidence has come to light over the alleged murder of The Rolling Stones guitarist Brian Jones.

Jones died 50 years ago, when he was found dead in the swimming pool of his home at Cotchford Farm in Sussex.

Now, Jones’ manager has claimed the guitarist was “out of his mind” on the night of his death on July 3, 1969.

Tom Keylock makes the claim in a previously-unseen interview which will be shown in a new Netflix documentary about the conspiracy theories surrounding Jones’ death.

Keylock was interviewed by investigative journalist Terry Rawlings, whose book Who Killed Christopher Robin? is the basis for the Netflix documentary. Its title is a reference to Cotchford Farm having been the inspiration for AA Milne when he created Winnie The Pooh.

Rawlings interviewed Keylock in 2009, but his interview has remained unseen until now.

In the interview, Keylock is shown telling Rawlings: “What people don’t know is that very strong hash cakes were made. That’s why they were all stoned and they didn’t know what day it was.”

Official police reports say there were just three other people present on the night of Jones’ death: the guitarist’s girlfriend Anna Wohlin, Keylock’s girlfriend Janet Lawson and builder Frank Thorogood, who has been accused in several previous reports as responsible for Jones’ death.

Jones’ daughter Barbara Marion stated earlier this month (July 3) that she believes her father was murdered. She told Sky News: “I don’t think his death was investigated as it should have been.”

Former paratrooper Keylock admitted he was present on the night too, along with two other previously-undisclosed other guests. He told Rawlings: “Janet told me she didn’t remember anything, as she was out of her head. They all were. I was the only one who wasn’t stoned.”

According to Keylock, he was told by his brother Frank Keylock – a senior Scotland Yard CID officer – that Jones’ death was ordered to have been a cover-up because of mistakes by local police.

It was alleged that Thorogood killed Jones in a dispute over money.- Source

The Conspiracy Theories Around the Death of Brian Jones: 50 Years Later

The Handyman

The most convincing ones center around a builder, Frank Thorogood, who Jones had employed to work on the house; he was staying at the rock star’s house with his girlfriend Janet Lawson who was the one who discovered the body floating in the pool. Like so many who serve the rich and famous, they become hangers-on, start to fancy themselves as friends. Thorogood threw parties at Jones’s house, basked in the glow of the celebrity.

On the day of Jones’ death, Thorogood and Jones supposedly argued over money Thorogood believed he was due; there was rough-housing in the pool. Thorogood held Jones’ head under a little too long.

No matter that Jones’ body showed no signs of a struggle. That is dismissed as sloppy police work. The theory was bolstered when another cast member from the time, Tom Keylock, claimed that Thorogood made a convenient deathbed confession to him that he had indeed killed the pop star. ‘It was me that did Brian,’ he supposedly said. ‘I just finally snapped.’

The Fixer

Keylock is a fascinating character; an ex-Arnhem paratroop veteran who makes a cameo appearance in Play With Fire, he was Bob Dylan’s driver on his 1966 tour of the UK and any 1969, he was a general fixer for the rock group and was called to the scene on the night of Jones’ death to try and keep the lid on the situation. His appetite for mischief and being at the centre of attention might make a cynic doubt his claim about Thorogood’s deathbed confession.

But for many, Keylock himself is on this list of supposed killers. The music writer Geoffrey Guiliano, who devoted years of his life to studying the conspiracy, believes that Keylock orchestrated an entire committee of people to Jones underwater (that way there would be less chance any sign of struggle), while Keylock stood on the side of the pool directing operations.

Keylock’s supposed involvement tends, for some, to throw suspicion onto the Stones themselves. Adding smoke to that fire, conspiracists pick on quotes by people like Anna Wohlin. At the time of Jones’ death, the 22-year-old Swede was his girlfriend and one of the guests at the house. She believes Thorogood killed Jones, but has also said that the Rolling Stones’ management “really know what happened.”

The Guitarist

Which brings us to Their Satanic Majesties themselves. Tom Keylock, runs this increasingly melodramatic theory, was directed to kill the guitarist by one or more of the Stones. We’re well into unicorn land at this point.

There are several supposed motives:

That Brian Jones had invented the name The Rolling Stones (true) and he wanted it back (except Jones had already signed away rights to the name, so… )

That Keith Richards had threatened Brian Jones with a knife earlier in the day and had ordered Keylock to finish the argument (which still goes around despite the fact that neither Richards or

Jones had actually seen each other for some time).

That Jones had recorded a masterpiece so phenomenal that the Stones felt threatened by it. (Though the only sessions he did around this time were shambolic and produced no music at all).
Satanic stuff. See below.

The Satanic murder plot

My own favorite. The Rolling Stones’ increasing darkness at the time, and their album Their Satanic Majesties Request, encouraged a few to go full Rosemary’s Baby: Jones was killed as a ritual sacrifice. The evidence? Jones’ last photo session with the Rolling Stones became the cover for their album Through The Past Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2), which came out in September 1969. Brian’s image is completely shattered in the back cover where the mirror cracks. He is also the right bottom of the five-pointed star configuration the band is laying in on the insert photo. QED.

The Royal Family

He was killed because he was having a secret affair with Princess Margaret, who had been visiting Cotchford Farm. This meme resurfaced when Princess Diana was supposedly killed for having an affair with the undesirable playboy Dodi Fayed. – Source


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