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He killed himself.
July 10, 2020
Avoiding to answer tough questions
July 10, 2020

He does not have an illness but has been taking a controversial anti-aging drug.

Reader Blind: This elderly handsome actor who was always more famous for his looks and connections during his heyday than his actual acting was snapped by paparazzi recently looking very unwell. He does not have an illness but has been taking a controversial anti-aging drug. His supply has been limited by the pandemic and now he is feeling the effects.

Source: http://www.crazydaysandnights.net

Reader Blind

This elderly handsome actor who was always more famous for his looks and connections during his heyday than his actual acting was snapped by paparazzi recently looking very unwell.

He does not have an illness but has been taking a controversial anti-aging drug.

His supply has been limited by the pandemic and now he is feeling the effects.

George Hamilton

blood plasma from young donors

George Hamilton looking a little weathered while out in LA

Maybe it’s time for George Hamilton to stay out of the sun.

The famously tanned actor was spotted in Los Angeles this week running errands and grabbing some food at a McDonald’s drive-thru looking a little … weathered.

The 80-year-old has always been a sun worshipper.

“It’s not the spray tan I’m after,” he revealed in an interview with Oprah Winfrey in 2017. “It’s the actual plug-in to the sun that I feel when I’m in it.

“So for me the idea of suntanning has always been a kind of health thing.”

In 2011 Hamilton did undergo treatment to have a skin cancer growth removed.

“He has been in the sun for years and years and years, and has managed to escape sun damage. This was something that several months ago he was told he would have to have,” his rep told E! News at the time. – Source

Column: As age-obsessed billionaires turn to ‘vampire’ therapies, the FDA takes a stand

The federal government finally took a stand this week on vampires feasting on the blood of the young.

It’s against the practice.

Actually, the Food and Drug Administration issued a warning about older people injecting themselves with the blood plasma of young donors — a fringe therapy that’s marketed as a way to fight aging and a variety of illnesses, including dementia, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

“Simply put, we’re concerned that some patients are being preyed upon by unscrupulous actors touting treatments of plasma from young donors as cures and remedies,” FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in a statement. “Such treatments have no proven clinical benefits for the uses for which these clinics are advertising them and are potentially harmful.”

He added: “Reports we’re seeing indicate that the dosing of these infusions can involve administration of large volumes of plasma that can be associated with significant risks, including infectious, allergic, respiratory and cardiovascular risks, among others.”

Shortly after the FDA’s announcement, a Monterey, Calif., start-up called Ambrosia Health said it would stop offering the injections. Customers paid $8,000 for a liter of young blood, $12,000 for two liters.

The vampire miracle cure is just one of numerous treatments that have formed a multibillion-dollar rejuvenation business as Americans grow older.

Some are legit, or involve minimal risk, such as taking fish oils to improve memory. Others are potentially dangerous or border on pure quackery.

“People have been peddling anti-aging snake oil since Day One,” said Kathy Black, a professor of aging studies and social work at the University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee.

“Gerontologists have long said that there’s a limit to how long you can live,” she told me, “and that’s about 120 years.”

Not that there’s anything new about wanting to cheat death — human beings have been keen on the idea since at least the ancient Egyptians.

What’s different now is the combination of enormous wealth being focused on such endeavors and technological breakthroughs that promise at least a shot at longevity, if not immortality. – Source